One Thing you CAN'T Measure in PR

One Thing you CAN'T Measure in PR

PR measurement has evolved, with the addition of solutions such as SeeDepth and AirPR.tape-measure-145397_640

The migration of people and content online makes it easier to connect the dots between PR effort and results. And international initiatives such as the Barcelona Principles aim to take a fresh look and improve the craft (see this Cision blog post).

Yet there is one thing that is impossible to measure – and is ignored at our own peril.

There is no technology that can look into the brains of people and know what they are thinking. That might be obvious, but why is it important? Don’t we just care about coverage, website traffic/conversions, i.e. things that can be measured? Should we consider every announcement or pitch that does not produce immediate results a flop?

Direct marketers understand the importance of repetition. They know that you often need to present your message with prospects several times before anything happens.

The recipient may see your ad or email pitch, or direct mailer, once, twice, three times – and not respond. But there is a cumulative effect of these impressions – each one may barely register, but eventually they bubble up from the subconscious into recognition, a sense of familiarity and perhaps even a response or order.

Similarly you may get no reaction to that pitch, that piece of minor news, that big idea.

But then, they bite on the next pitch… or call you… or, you get them on the phone for the first time after all these pitches and they are warm and friendly, like they were expecting the call.

So I tell clients, “Sure we’ll pitch or send that minor news. Don’t expect coverage, but do hope we are gaining mind share that will pay off in the long term.”

This is also the reason why one shot PR programs and pay for performance seem short sighted.

You can’t measure this kind of impression.

(Please note, and this is VERY IMPORTANT – I am not recommending that you carpet bomb reporters, AKA spam them, with the hope that brute force persistence and repetition will pay off.  You will create negative impressions and do the program more harm than good. Always respect their pitch preferences and make sure the info is relevant to their coverage areas.  Moderation and balance are important).

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