Gaining Online Visibility for your Blog Posts and News

By Bob Geller, SVP

Most PR people are familiar with the term “Send & Pray.” As a profession, we have learned to do better than simply blasting out press materials and praying that someone, anyone will cover the news.

But how well do these tactics translate to the online and social media worlds? How do you maximize online visibility for blog posts and other online content?

In my post today on Flack’s Revenge today, I cover a number of techniques for transcending what I call “Post and Pray” syndrome.

These include:

– Making sure the content is SEO optimized
– Making sure your blog supports pinging
– Using Web analytics to track results
– Fine tuning approach based on analysis

You can read the full article here

2 Comments
  • Anonymous

    December 20, 2007 at 4:38 pm Reply

    As always, the bottom line in PR is being active. In my short experience, passivity does not work when conducting pro-active outreach.

    There are several ways to avoid the “post and pray” mentality and to direct your client’s initiatives. Within an SMR there are active links to either stories or videos that can be posted on “community-based popularity” web sites, i.e. digg/YouTube, which an individual could then popularize by emailing the link to friends/family/colleagues.

    This can be construed as “slanting the vote,” so colleagues should be cognizant of sending their vote from the same domain.

  • Bob Geller

    December 21, 2007 at 10:48 am Reply

    Thanks for commenting, I agree being proactive counts.

    The one area where I will differ is the hiding of identity, both in general and when you are voting stories.

    The blogosphere encourages transparency, and sooner or later most people get outed anyway when they are trying to do things anonymously.

    I think a new SMPR code of ethics should advise against anonymity. As far as “slanting” the vote or otherwise stuffing ballots on Digg, people are OK (ethically, anyway, at least IMHO) if they adhere to the policies set by sites like Digg, Reddit, etc.

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